I am an impressionistic painter working in oils on gesso board and canvas.  I create paintings to fill our world with peace, beauty, color and inspiration, something we all could use a little more of from time to time.  After the last of my three children became a bit more independent I really felt the need to pursue my love of painting. The challenge was how to fit it into an already busy life. So I made the commitment to wake up bright and early every day (5:15 to be exact), and paint. This daily painting practice is a perfect fit for a busy life. After nearly six years my work is developing into a consistent style although my subject matter can range from florals to landscapes, from animals to antique trucks. Whatever muse comes my way is worth exploring and learning from. I strive to delight and make the world more beautiful, one painting at a time. Someday, when life is a bit simpler, I look forward to painting all day long and spreading beauty wherever I go.

17-19 W. Mechanic Street

New Hope, Pa 18938

(215) 738-1005

terry@thestudionewhope.com



Jeremy Randall

Jane Gottlieb

Marilee Schumann

Owner |Stylist | Artist Terry found that a blank canvas and oil palette offered many of the same things she loved about creating haircuts to suit her clients. Her paintings continue to be inspired by the art she sees in everyday life, especially in her favorite muses, her 2 adorable, pose-ready pups, Pete the Pug and Mabel the French Bulldog.  

The Studio is proud to support independent artists, and to put beautiful, affordable art into the homes and hands of appreciative owners.  Meet The Studio's current Featured Artists here. Visit the gallery in person to view the showcased pieces, plus additional work.

  Valerie Ostenak’s art training began as a young child when she asked her mother how to draw the wind blowing. From there, her curiosity of how to express what she thought and felt expanded from drawing and painting to metals. Her creative plate was full with painting, jewelry and metalsmithing courses at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff AZ, and continued at California State University Long Beach, CA. She has worked with interior designers, architects, and blacksmiths designing and creating sculpture, lighting, interior furnishings, and a railing at the Grand Canyon.  Art and design is her life.

  Tom has been painting full time for about ten years, but he was always creating art. Since the age of four, he knew he wanted to be an artist. The wide open skies and the patchwork designs of the Iowa farmland from his childhood years can be seen as an integral part of his paintings. 
Tom Hlas creates vibrant abstract paintings that reflect his world with a rich boldness in both color and composition, and it has a resonance that is universal. He says his art is informed by his memories and currant thoughts, as well as by “being inspired by the colors and sights around me, especially the ever-changing sky and rural landscapes. I refer to my paintings as a geography of the heart and mind.” 
  His paintings are about balance, color, shape and movement. A sense of place is what one feels looking at Tom’s art. It draws you in and tugs at your heart. And one can’t help but notice a recurring element in much of Tom’s work: the circle. It appears in many shapes and sizes, in subtle forms as well as through repetition and pattern. “The circle is a primal mark denoting creation, infinity, unity, and wholeness with its sacredness and sensuality,” says Tom. 
  It’s worth noting, however, that living in the Connecticut countryside has had an impact on Tom’s work. On his blog, he says, “As I look back at the art I’ve created the last couple months, I’ve noticed that while my use of circles has continued, squares and rectangles have appeared in a strong way.” He also points out that his paintings are not depictions of actual locations. “Rather my intent is to create spaces and places where the mind can travel, where one can daydream, where one can mentally rest and enjoy a sense of belonging and a sense of being at home.”

Terry Meehan

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Artists

Terry Meehan

Gallery  | Spring Hours

Monday              10 am - 4 pm

Tuesday              By Appointment Only

Wednesday        10 am - 5 pm

Thursday            11 am - 6 pm

Friday                  11 am - 8 pm

Saturday             11 am - 9 pm

Sunday                11 am - 6 pm



(1957-2014) Born in Caracas, Venezuela Guillermo Barreto spent most of his youth preoccupied with drawing and other creative activities. He spent many days helping Venezuelan artist Cesar Rengifo around his studio. During this time came his inspiration to become a painter. After high school he studied at Cristobal Rojas school of art and Pedro Leon Castro University.  It was there he cultivated a true appreciation of art and affirmed his desire to pursue a career as an artist. During the years that followed Guillermo earned a living working in the magazine publishing industry. He was a lay-out artist an illustrator and even humorist with his own column in a popular magazine in Caracas. Although he developed his craft in a technical sense, he had not fulfilled his desire to grow in a classical sense. Guillermo realized he would have to go to New York City for a chance to explore and to perfect a style all his own.  In 1980  Guillermo arrived in New York City. Upon arrival he enrolled in courses at the Art Students League and the School of Visual Arts.  His work has been on exhibit from New York to Florida, throughout France,  Monaco,  Germany,  Belgium, and the Galerie Schlassgoart in Luxembourg. Guillermo’s work has been displayed at Cornell University,  New York University, Dacia Gallery, the Venezuelan Consulate, and  forms part of the permanent art collection of the Chilean Mission before the United Nations.

I am a painter who paints brightly colored,  joyful and ethereal acrylic works on canvas. The backgrounds are meticulously built up, over the course of days, with many, many layers of transparent drips, each layer drying between the next, creating depth and lending a beautiful effect to the image that often resembles hand-painted fabrics or batik.  MY TREES ARE UNIVERSAL SYMBOLS THAT CONJURE METAPHORS OF LIFE,FAMILY, COMMUNITY & LOVE.

 (1957-2014) Born in Caracas, Venezuela Guillermo Barreto spent most of his youth preoccupied with drawing and other creative activities. He spent many days helping Venezuelan artist Cesar Rengifo around his studio. During this time came his inspiration to become a painter. After high school he studied at Cristobal Rojas school of art and Pedro Leon Castro University.  It was there he cultivated a true appreciation of art and affirmed his desire to pursue a career as an artist. During the years that followed Guillermo earned a living working in the magazine publishing industry. He was a lay-out artist an illustrator and even humorist with his own column in a popular magazine in Caracas. Although he developed his craft in a technical sense, he had not fulfilled his desire to grow in a classical sense. Guillermo realized he would have to go to New York City for a chance to explore and to perfect a style all his own.  In 1980  Guillermo arrived in New York City. Upon arrival he enrolled in courses at the Art Students League and the School of Visual Arts.  His work has been on exhibit from New York to Florida, throughout France,  Monaco,  Germany,  Belgium, and the Galerie Schlassgoart in Luxembourg. Guillermo’s work has been displayed at Cornell University,  New York University, Dacia Gallery, the Venezuelan Consulate, and  forms part of the permanent art collection of the Chilean Mission before the United Nations.

Christopher Kennedy

Salon  | spring Hours

Monday                  10 am - 4 pm

Tuesday                  Closed

Wednesday            10 am - 5 pm

Thursday               11 am - 7 pm

Friday                     10 am - 6 pm

Saturday                10 am - 5 pm

Sunday                   11 am - 3 pm


Dar James

Winifred Weiss

Lara Ivonovic

Traveling through outback Australia, Lara was struck by jumbled clusters of abandoned, rusty vintage cars, and the eerie, ghostly quality of the barren terrain. It seemed evocative of the lost romance of a bygone era - yet set in a desolate landscapes which gave few clues to its history.  She tried to convey this ethereal feeling by using impressionistic, feathery brushstrokes and blurred edges, to create a sensation of movement and an aura of mystery. Incongruous groupings and strange juxtapositions created dramatic shapes and the often blinding sunlight had a shimmering, fragmentary quality, casting pools of the blackest shadow in that dusty wilderness.  Lara found the cars especially poignant - missing headlights, doors hanging off their hinges, the rusty patina and peeling layers of paint were reminiscent of a body's demise.  As the vehicles rusted, vegetation grew up through them or they sank into the soil and appeared to be reclaimed by it.  Lara’s current work is inspired by abandoned factories and broken down buildings. The theme of who or what once occupied these huge, haunting spaces fascinates her. “I feel this work is a natural progression from my previous subject matter because the paintings explore mysteries of the past contained within the empty shells of buildings, and an uncertain future.”
Born in 1967 and raised in London, England. Lara attended St Martin’s School of Art in London and then Rhode Island School of Design. Lara took a trip around the Australian outback in 1999, and was so inspired by the landscape and way of life there that she decided to move to Sydney. This was the first time she was able to paint full time and it was a revelation. Lara was represented in Sydney by several galleries who showed her paintings of abandoned rusty vehicles.  Lara’s paintings were very well received and she sold over 70 pieces in 3 solo shows including several to actor Gabriel Byrne.  She moved to the United States in 2005, and has exhibited her paintings in New York City, as well as regional galleries. She currently lives and works in Westchester County,NY with her family.

Tom Hlas

My passion for pottery goes back thirty-five years. I have a diverse background in art and an MFA in sculpture, but my life is centered on making pots. I am interested in the humble uses of pottery – water, beans, bread dough, and soup; and the more abstract symbolic uses – flower arranging, human remains, sacrifice, ritual, and contemplation.  My pottery is primarily functional. I try to be aware of the convenience and comfort of the user, so my pots may become favorite tools in the kitchen or on the table. And I want to make beautiful pots that enhance the beauty of the house, with simplicity and elegance. And finally, I am interested in the role pottery plays in the history of human culture, its place in domestic life, in ritual, and in artistic expression. Pottery has existed throughout the history of human culture and provides me with an entry into the whole of human experience.  I believe that our lives are improved by using handmade, locally made, individually made objects.  My current work is white stoneware clay with black underglaze decoration, fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.

Kim Myers Smith

Valerie Ostenak

Jeremy Randall received his B.F.A. from Syracuse University and his M.F.A. in ceramics from the University of Florida, and has been making his hand built pottery professionally since 2005. He currently lives in Tully, New York, where he owns and operates his home studio.

Guillermo Barreto

Kyoto & Cairn Lanterns

 I grew up in Philadelphia, studied piano at the the Philadelphia Musical Academy, physics at the University of Pennsylvania and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. I spent hours drawing plaster casts, painting still lifes and models, learned anatomy from Robert Beverly Hale and wondered how to communicate my ideas through art. I have watched how we respond to work in galleries and to each other; how we approach both with our own narratives, colored by our experiences and beliefs. My intention as an artist is a small part of the experience of looking at a work of art, and so my figures are meant to encourage speculation; the gestures are subtle and the expressions ambiguous. They are the beginning of a story.

  Light and the effect it has on everything has fascinated me all my life.  The idea of creating images from light that one cannot actually see came to me a few years ago. I literally slipped while capturing a night shot over Toronto harbor and was intrigued by the fragments of traveling light the camera had captured that I couldn’t see with my own eyes.  That posed a life-changing question:  Could I finesse that accidental process and create viable works of art?  I was hooked. Three months later I had the answer and had perfected a technique. I call it Photo Luminism.

  Photo Luminism allows me to capture gloriously colorful abstraction or graphic-like subjects entirely in-camera.  Purist images then evolve from building lightscapes.  I recreate what I see in my mind’s eye, often standing for hours in the dark until I get the image right.  
  Having achieved my goal of a new art form, what drives me now is the desire to keep it fresh and new, to keep turning corners to see what else is there.  My latest development is the adaptation of the technique to work with natural light and Nature’s colors. This has opened up a whole new, exciting world for me, keeping my enthusiasm in top gear. Examples of these recent works are the Trees Revered and Passing Impressions series. I have also started my Surrealism series, which mixes real life and Photo Luminism forms in surreal settings. The Icon Negatives series will be making its debut in June. 
  Another creative turn has been to move my 2-dimensional creations into the 3-dimensional realm by converting them into internally-lit sculptures. My first prototype, “Exhibitionist,” was a winner of the New Hope Outdoor Sculpture initiative in 2016. Construction should begin later this year for installation in 2018.

I have been expressing my joy of art with paint, shapes and colors since I was very young.  I began as a painter, evolved into a photographer, and eventually began hand painting with vivid colors on individual Cibachrome prints over thirty years ago, creating a wonderful uplifting reality.  Now I scan my one-of-a-kind hand-painted prints, enhance them with Photoshop and produce archival prints on aluminum, canvas and paper. 

“Color is luscious to me. It's a luxury to be able to fill my life with color. Color is energy; it evokes emotion and feelings, and it makes you feel good - it really does pick you up, and suddenly you are smiling."

Kyoto Lanterns are a series of sculptural lighting that capture the studied beauty and simplicity of the Japanese aesthetic while utilizing the perfect relationship of glass and light. The details and palate reflect a variety of elements such as fibers of woven mats or paper lanterns, the bindings of traditional packages or bamboo fencing, as well as elements of nature. Layered surface patterns of different hues and opacities allow a subtle transmission of light within to accentuate the qualities of the glass while creating a serene and meditative focal point.  Each lantern is individually free blown and crafted by the artist. All the details are of glass. The light source is a 25 watt/ 30 volt incadescant.